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The Adventures of Boating

Nov 21, 2017

Five-guys-fishing-post

You’ve purchased a boat. This is probably the result of a long-cherished dream, and comes with a substantial investment and responsibility. It’s also your key to marine adventures and can open up new worlds for you, in far-flung locations, or right in your own back yard. Canada has some of the most stunning waters in the world, so why not start here?

Have boat, will travel

Canada’s premiere boating areas stretch across the country. There are incredible adventures to be had in discovering BC’s 27,000+ kilometres of coastline. Navigate to Desolation Sound, the northernmost point of the Sunshine Coast, where stunning fjords and teeming wildlife are also matched with warm waters that can reach almost 80 degrees in the summer. In Manitoba, the extraordinary Whiteshell Provincial Park offers almost 2800 square meters of protected parklands, and boaters have over 200 lakes to explore – some remote and pristine, others with sand beaches and amenities. And don’t miss paying a respectful visit to the ancient Indigenous petroforms at Bannock Point when you are there. Finally, head east to explore the rugged coast of the St. Lawrence along Quebec’s Côte-Nord from Tadoussac to Blanc-Sablon. If you go from late June to early September, you might get lucky and see a pod of whales sail by you – even a blue whale, the largest creature on the planet!

Gone fishing

Canada is home to some extraordinary fishing, so take your boat and fishing license, load up on insurance, and head out (preferably with a guide) to catch yourself a big fish. Halibut, which typically weigh over 20 pounds, and can even get up to 100 pounds, fits the bill. Found in the deep waters near BC’s Tofino and Uceulet, they are easiest to catch in May when they are more likely to be found in shallower waters. Be prepared to put up a fight! Saskatchewan’s Diefenbaker Lake offers a wide array of trophy-sized fish to catch – the current world record holder rainbow trout was pulled from here – everything from walleye, trout, pike, even sturgeon! If you are looking for salmon, Lake Ontario, despite being the smallest of the great lakes, is one of the deepest, and this makes for excellent chinook and coho salmon fishing. The chinook average 10 to 30 pounds, making Lake Ontario the best place for salmon fishing in Canada outside of BC.

Underwater explorations

Scuba diving in Canada is considered some of the best available. It’s not to be taken lightly – you will need training and accreditation – but when you are ready, you can use your boat to access extraordinary experiences underwater. Jacques Cousteau named the waters off of Port Hardy the best cold-water scuba diving in the world – the vibrant, colourful ecology is astonishing, and Browning Wall is understood to be one of the best places to observe its beauty, particularly as the water visibility is excellent. Fathom Five Marine Park on Ontario’s Georgian Bay also offers extraordinarily clear waters – sometimes up to 80 feet – all the better to see the array of both historical and manmade shipwrecks, suitable for novices as well as more experienced divers. And Forillon National Park in Quebec offers a deeper look at the beds of St. Lawrence, as well as a chance to dive or snorkel with playful seals. Arm yourself properly – all of these waters are very cold, especially farther down, and a wet suit or dry shell is required.

Lay the foundation for your adventures

Canada has a wealth of adventurous boating experiences for those who want to explore its incredible coasts and lakes. As with any adventure, being prepared is important. Making sure that you have the correct documents, such as boating and fishing licenses, and accreditation for riskier pursuits like diving, is key, as is having the correct boat insurance – our PMU broker experts can make sure that you haven’t missed anything. Knowing you have the right boat insurance coverage will let you adventure out on your boat and maximize the fun factor!

Find your local PMU broker and don't miss a day on the great Canadian waters.